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Gallery of Needlework
Contemporary Engravings
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Knitters 1698 The Stockings Knitters, 1698. By Christoph Weigel. The different stages necessary in knitting the stockings are shown here. Note that it is knitted by hand. This is not because there was no knitting machine yet invented, on the contrary. The first knitting machine, which was not efficient by then, was invented in England in Queen Elizabeth I's reign. But hand knitting continued on for a long time and was a flourishing craft. Machine knitted silk stockings exclusively for the aristocracy and those who could afford them. German Knitters 1751 
Stockings Knitters, 1751. From Diderot's Encyclopédie. Models for stockings can be seen in the back, neatly stacked up. Knitting the fine stockings had by then been a machine process for quite some time. French
Stitcher 1627Embroideress with Amor, 1627. By J. Sweelinck. A lady is shown embroidering on a frame, which keeps the material tight. A pair of shears are lying on the floor, but scissors were also in use, as can be seen on an earlier engraving from 1568, where a silk-embroiderer is shown with his equipment. Dutch Knitters 1751 
Stockings Knitters, 1751. From Diderot's Encyclopédie. Here the machine can be seen on the left, where a stocking is currently being knitted. The woman on the right is gathering the fine silk threads used on the devices on her table. Note that here in this trade in the middle of the 18th century men and women are working together. French
Stitchers 1750French Embroiderer's Workshop (detail left), 1750. From Diderot's Encyclopédie. The embroideress, note that now two female workers are shown, embroidering was in earlier times a male profession, showing a side panel of a waistcoat. Garments were always first embroidered and then cut out. French Stitchers 1750French Embroiderer's Workshop (detail left), 1750. From Diderot's Encyclopédie. The embroideress is obviously working on the other waistcoat panel. Scissors, thread and bowls with probably purls and sequins lying on the stretched out fabric, kept taught by the large frame. French
Stitcher 1698 The Silk Embroiderer, 1698. By Christoph Weigel. By then professional embroidery, just like all the other crafts, were done by men. Women to embroider at home for their own use. Panels of finished embroideries are leaning against the wall, while the man is working, bent over the frame, which is simpler than the one compared to in 1750, but the logic behind the embroidery frame workings has been the same for centuries already. Skeins of coloured silks are gathered in a basket behind the embroidery. German School 1698Embroidery Lessons, 1689. By e. Porzelius. Girls are seen who receive their embroidery lessons, the first steps to a skill which was highly regarded everywhere. Some home-made needlework is surviving in museums today and the quality is truly astounding, showing great skills and artwork. Note the girl with the bobbin lacemaking pillow on the right. German
Weavers 1698 The Weaver, 1698. By Christoph Weigel. The loom can be seen in detail on this engraving, worked with pedals. The worker is about to move the shuttle back through the threads. The man on the left is pulling wool through a weaving comb. A barrel and basket with wools are seen on the foreground. German  

 

Female Costumes
Ladies' Baroque Clothing

Indoor Garments | Footwear | Accessories | Hairstyles | Head-dresses | Development of the Fontange
Hairstyles by Vermeer | Dress Colours by Vermeer | Head-dresses by Vermeer

Costume Focus Headwear & Neckwear
| Costume Focus Working Women
Costume Focus Children's Clothing
Ladies' Costume Quotes

Male Costumes
Gentlemen's Baroque Clothing

Indoor Garments | Footwear | Accessories | Hairstyles | Head-dresses

Costume Colours by Vermeer | Hair- and Head-dresses by Vermeer

Gentlemen's Costume Quotes

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Embroidery Gallery | Gallery of Needlework Engravings
Lace Gallery & Identification
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